Going to Heaven!


Goingto Heaven!
Author: Poetry of Emily Dickinson 
Description: http://www.eliteskills.com/strip.jpg

Going to Heaven!

I don't know when-
Pray do not ask me how!
Indeed I'm too astonished
To think of answering you!
Going to Heaven!
How dim it sounds!
And yet it will be done


As sure as flocks go home at night
Unto the Shepherd's arm!Perhaps you're going too!
Who knows?
If you should get there first
Save just a little space for me
Close to the two I lost-
The smallest "Robe" will fit me
And just a bit of "Crown"-
For you know we do not mind our dress
When we are going home-I'm glad I don't believe it
For it would stop my breath-
And I'd like to look a little more
At such a curious Earth!
I'm glad they did believe it
Whom I have never found


Since the might Autumn afternoon
I left them in the ground. 

Analysis

Emily Dickinson is such a unique poet that it is very difficult to place her in any single tradition--she seems to come from everywhere and nowhere at once. Her poetic form, with her customary four-line stanzas, ABCB rhyme schemes, and alternations in iambic meter between tetrameter and trimeter, is derived from Psalms and Protestant hymns, but Dickinson so thoroughly appropriates the forms--interposing her own long, rhythmic dashes designed to interrupt the meter and indicate short pauses--that the resemblance seems quite faint. Her subjects are often parts of the topography of her own psyche; she explores her own feelings with painstaking and often painful honesty but never loses sight of their universal poetic application; one of her greatest techniques is to write about the particulars of her own emotions in a kind of universal homiletic or adage-like tone ("After great pain, a formal feeling comes") that seems to describe the reader's mind as well as it does the poet's. Dickinson is not a "philosophical poet"; unlike Wordsworth or Yeats, she makes no effort to organize her thoughts and feelings into a coherent, unified worldview. Rather, her poems simply record thoughts and feelings experienced naturally over the course of a lifetime devoted to reflection and creativity: the powerful mind represented in these records is by turns astonishing, compelling, moving, and thought-provoking, and emerges much more vividly than if Dickinson had orchestrated her work according to a preconceived philosophical system.
Of course, Dickinson's greatest achievement as a poet of inwardness is her brilliant, diamond-hard language. Dickinson often writes aphoristically, meaning that she compresses a great deal of meaning into a very small number of words. This can make her poems hard to understand on a first reading, but when their meaning does unveil itself, it often explodes in the mind all at once, and lines that seemed baffling can become intensely and unforgettably clear. Other poems--many of her most famous, in fact--are much less difficult to understand, and they exhibit her extraordinary powers of observation and description. Dickinson's imagination can lead her into very peculiar territory--some of her most famous poems are bizarre death-fantasies and astonishing metaphorical conceits--but she is equally deft in her navigation of the domestic, writing beautiful nature-lyrics alongside her wild flights of imagination and often combining the two with great facility.
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